Rare Breed, The - Looking For Today (LP)

Rare Breed, The - Looking For Today (LP)

  • $22.99



Origin: USA
Released: 2018
Catalog number: RIPLP080

"Looking for Today is the debut full-length by Los Angeles trio The Rare Breed, and as thick as the band lays it on in touting their love of Sabbathian ways — and why not; “Mountain of Dreams” takes them to near-Sheavy levels of Sab worship and they named their album after a Black Sabbath song — it’s hard to listen to songs like “The Stranger” and “Rusted Diamond” and not think of more modern, Uncle Acid-style garage doom swing. “Visions” has more of a later-Ozzy-era vibe, and “Echoes” positively gallops in the drums, but in its shuffle, closer “Witches Lore” has some of that now-tinged rhythm as well (and some gallop of its own to boot), so there’s more going on than just “we heard ‘Sweet Leaf’ and decided to start a band,” however much guitarist Oscar de la Torre‘s vocals might be derived from the work of a certain Mr. Osbourne.

Wherever it was coming from, The Rare Breed released Looking for Today back in the BeforeTime, in the long-long-ago — 2016 — and this month the record will get its post-apocalyptic reissue via Ripple Music" -- The Obelisk

"Rare Breed take the formula of Uncle Acid And The Deadbeats and deliver a neat record that clocks in at just over the 30-minute mark. As I said earlier the voice of Oscar De la Torre is reminiscent of Ozzy’s vocals especially back in the (last 3 Black Sabbath LPs) days when he used to reach high notes. The melodies have this doom melancholy of the first Iron Maiden album and late 70s hard rock furious guitar tone. So guitars have the main role in the first track and get a bit faster on the next tracks. There is also a strong presence of something in the vein of Def Leppard or by stretching it a bit, a proto-glam sense. “Mountain Of Dreams” is a shout out to 70s Alice Cooper works. Things get heavier and doomier in the last two tracks with the help of the tight rhythm section (Joey Castle’s bass and Hernan Rojas’s drums). While the De la Torre’s guitar don’t strike the stand alone monolithic Iommic riffs, still has the 70s hard rock crunchy melodies for headbanging accompanied with or by stellar solos." - -More Fuzz